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Grief Support Drop-in Group

A Grief Support Drop-in Group meets the third Thursday of each month from 7–8 pm at Provincial Pal [ ... ]

ALPHA sessions

Explore life, faith and meaning in an open and safe environment. ALPHA is a series of interactive se [ ... ]

New commission by Robert Houle added to collection

Robert Houle, O-ween du muh waun (We were Told), 2017, oil on canvas triptych, commissioned with the A.G. and Eliza Jane Ramsden Endowment Fund, 2017 Anishnaabe artist, Robert Houle, a member of the Sandy Bay First Nation, near Winnipeg, Manitoba, recently attended the opening of the Confederation Centre Art Gallery’s permanent collection exhibition, Re: Collection, to make introductory remarks and present a public talk on his 2017 painting, O-ween du muh waun (We were Told).

Commissioned by Confederation Centre Art Gallery (CCAG) to mark the 150th anniversary of Canadian Confederation, Houle’s oil on canvas triptych is a consideration of the long First Nation’s presence in this land, and the idea of history painting.

Houle’s work is an addition to the Gallery’s collection and specifically to the Confederation Murals Series, which includes works by Jean Paul Lemieux, John Fox, and Jack Shadbolt, commissioned in 1964, and by Jane Ash Poitras, Yvon Gallant, and Wanda Koop commissioned in the 1990s.

Houle’s new painting is a further elaboration on his 1992 work, Kanata (collection of the National Gallery of Canada), in which he appropriates and reimagines the composition of Benjamin West’s 1770 painting, The Death of General Wolfe. West’s painting mythologized the battlefield death of the British general who led his troops to victory in the 1759 Battle of Quebec. Houle drew all the figures in West’s composition in conté, reserving colour for only the indigenous figure in the foreground.

In his new work, O-ween du muh waun (We were Told) Houle focuses on this same Delaware warrior figure, seated on the Plains of Abraham, and facing east. He eliminates all the other figures from West’s composition. “The (Canada) 150 idea was not an issue for me, but rather a correction to clarify that my sense of country dates back further than 1867,” Houle explains. “Our friendship and numbered treaties are also preceded by the presence of our ancestors going back millennia.”

Houle was born in St. Boniface, Manitoba, in 1947 and currently resides in Toronto. He is widely-acclaimed for bridging indigenous history and contemporary art. In 2015 he received the Governor General’s Award in Visual and Media Art.

O-ween du muh waun (We Were Told) is on display in Upper West Gallery at the CCAG until December 31.

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Some Upcoming Events

Down With Demon Rum

September 30
The Haviland Club Down With Demon Rum: Stories and Songs of Rum Running on Prince Edwar [ ... ]

Dancing with the Stars

Hospice PEI’s event celebrates 7th year October 20
Murphy Community Centre October 20, 2018  [ ... ]

Colette

October 15–25
City Cinema rating tba
Dir: Wash Westmoreland, UK, 111 min. Keira Knightley, Dominic  [ ... ]

Recent News & Articles

Drawing the line

Profile: Sandy Carruthers by Jane Ledwell Retired for a year now after twenty-five years teaching  [ ... ]

Filmworks Summerside

Film series is back for 7th season Filmworks Summerside opens for their 7th season on September 12  [ ... ]

An Island wish

On August 23, 4 year old Cooper Coughlin will arrive on Prince Edward Island soil for a once in a li [ ... ]